WSU Shield
New joint commitment of GAVI and WSU to eliminate human suffering due to rabies
Expanding on the World Health Organization’s (WHO) commitment to end human rabies deaths by 2030, the Global Alliance Vaccine Initiative (GAVI) is expanding access to human rabies vaccines for post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) to provide equitable access to human rabies prevention following a suspected dog bite
WSU News


Superbugs
While death by “superbugs” is still fairly rare, the World Health Organization warns that, if bacteria keep evolving drug resistance at the rate they have been, such bugs will globally cause 10 million deaths per year by 2050.
Washington State Magazine


WSU loses friend and donor, Paul Allen
Those who knew Paul G. Allen at Washington State University were taken with both shock and sadness when they learned of his death today.
WSU News


$2.2 million gift creates School of Molecular Biosciences graduate fellowships
A $2.2 million gift from the estate of Bernadine and James Seabrandt will create the Bernadine Fulfs Seabrandt Graduate Fellowship in Molecular Biosciences at Washington State University’s School of Molecular Biosciences.
WSU News


WSU Shield
10 Years: WSU’s Global Animal Health pursues ‘One World. One Health.’
When people have adequate sanitation and clean water, and the animals they raise for food are free from disease, those people not only are healthier, but they have improved opportunities in life through higher income, better education and overall well-being. That is One Health.
WSU News


Researchers named to Washington State Academy of Sciences
Four Washington State University faculty have been elected to the Washington State Academy of Sciences and two others were chosen to serve on the academy’s leadership board in 2018.
WSU News


Researchers map DNA damage links to onset of skin cancer
A critical link in mapping recurrent mutations of melanoma — the most serious form of skin cancer in humans — has been discovered by researchers at Washington State University School of Molecular Biosciences, in collaboration with researchers at Georgia State University.
WSU News


WSU researchers find critical link for melanoma, most deadly skin cancer
A critical step in understanding melanoma — the deadliest form of skin cancer — has been taken by researchers at Washington State University's School of Molecular Biosciences.
KXLY.com


WSU researchers establish new tool to study Cryptosporidium in healthy tissues
Washington State University researchers have developed a new approach for studying Cryptosporidium, a waterborne gastrointestinal parasite now recognized as one of the leading causes of potentially life-threatening diarrheal disease in young children worldwide.
WSU News


WSU College of Veterinary Medicine hires elk hoof disease research leader
Margaret Wild, since 2000 the chief wildlife veterinarian for the National Park Service, has been selected to lead Washington’s elk hoof disease research efforts.
WSU News


WSU, Veterinary Clinics Working to End Rabies
Every time a dog comes in for a rabies vaccination at the Lien Animal Clinic in West Seattle, the clinic donates $1 to the WSU Canine Rabies Vaccination Program to help end rabies around the globe.
WSU News


WSU rabies vaccination teams reach one million dogs
Working with African, international and local partnerships, Washington State University’s Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health is developing the strategies for the elimination of rabies.
WSU News


360-degree video: Vaccinating dogs to eliminate rabies
In Tanzania and other East African countries, Washington State University and their partners are working to eliminate rabies in humans by 2030 by vaccinating domestic dogs.
Washington State Magazine


WSU looks for practices to thwart antimicrobial resistance
The death last year of a woman in Reno, Nev., from an infection resistant to every type of antibiotic available in the U.S. highlights how serious the threat of antimicrobial resistance has become.
WSU News


Rabies vaccine found effective even after warm storage
A Washington State University-led research team determined rabies vaccines stored at warmer temperatures still protect against the disease in dogs.
WSU News